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earthriseThere are sites that do memorial flights, most notably are Celestis and Elysium Space.   For $1990 USD, you can launch 1 gram of cremains into space and for many this seem like bit of a disappointment scope of the missions could have more of a purpose for each gram of payload.    The purist in the field should loosen their ties, and roll up their sleeves and collaborate to have funding when it comes to space science.

Since NASA announced ELaNa and the Cubesat, creates a bridge  towards nanoscale technologies, the weight of payload are no longer an issue.   It should not come as a surprise that human bones are carbon which can manufactured into just about anything, and therefore the payload space can be used for real science.

Commissioning Missions for Space Exploration

Space Cremations has an interest commissioning several public missions, each with funding goals which will  the priority and scale for future exploration vehicles which will include a digital columbaria for the participant of each mission that will be used to document images, bio and obituaries.       Each mission will have a specific objectives which we hope may strike cord with those of use who grew up with Star Trek,  NASA, and those who wanted to “Rest In Space” to fulfill their wishes in a very dignified manner.

Objectives for some of our missions may seem taboo in poor taste to some, but we do invite you review all of the missions to see if one them is a fit that is agreeable to surviving family members as reasonable way to memorialize.   Some our missions have very ambitious goals and may be scrubbed but we will not consider any memorial missions failures and even if catastrophic failure occurs, we have contingency for memorial manifest on subsequent missions that will fall within the similar parameters.

Some of the missions will be fairly low-tech and conventional, while others will of a more hi-tech, long term using current state-of-the-art technology for commercial applications in order to garner sponsorship for further space exploration for generations to come.